A Spunky Spaniel: A Brittany Breed Guide

Carrie Pallardy

Brittany breed guide
Brittanys are a sporting breed of dog. Relatively petite, these pups seem to run on endless energy and zest for life. From the history of the breed to what to expect when you live with a Brittany, learn about this loveable breed.
 
French Roots
 
The Brittany, named for a region in France, has a long history as a bird hunting dog. It is possible that the breed as we know it came into being when English pointers were left to breed with the spaniels local to Brittany, according to The Brittany Club in New Zealand.
 
The official breed name was once Brittany Spaniel, but once introduced in the United States (in the early 1930s), the dogs gained more of a reputation as a pointer than a spaniel. The American Kennel Club (AKC) officially changed the breed name to simply “Brittany” in 1982.
 Brittany dog breed guide
Brittany Basics
 
Brittanys are medium-sized dogs, weighing 30 to 40 pounds, according to The Spruce Pets. The breed has a life expectancy of 12 to 14 years, according to the AKC. Over their lives, Brittanys make devoted and energetic companions.
 
The physical appearance of the Brittany makes it clear why “spaniel” was once a part of the breed name. The floppy ears and happy grin are reminiscent of other spaniel breeds. But, Brittany’s tend to be taller than other spaniels.
 
When it comes to coat and coloring, Brittanys are snow white with splashes of color, usually orange or a reddish brown. The texture of their fur is straight or slightly wavy; occasional brushing and bathing is usually enough to keep their coat looking sharp.
 
Brittany dog breed guide
Breed Personality
 
Bred as a bird dog, Brittanys are incredibly driven and energetic. Owners, of course, do not need to hunt these dogs, but they do need to provide adequate outlets for that energy. Brittanys love to play fetch and learn new tasks with their owners.
 
Brittanys are generally affable, getting along with kids and other pets. But, like all breeds, they need proper training and socialization. Obedient and willing to learn, Brittanys respond well to patient training.
 
Brittany dog breed guide
At Home with a Brittany
 
As high-energy and affectionate dogs, Brittanys do not do well spending large chunks of time alone. The breed can be prone to separation anxiety – something to keep in mind when you think about adding a new pet to your schedule.  If you have the time and the desire to bring a Brittany home, they will do their best to please.
 
If you are looking for a Brittany, you can go the breeder route (making sure to find a responsible option), or you can look into rescue agencies. American Brittany Rescue helps to find Brittanys homes all over the country.
 

Thank You

Thank you for your time and we hope that you found some value in the article.
If you are a Brittany lover, you might like what we have for you!
We designed a cool tee and mug for all the Brittany lovers. Let us know what you think! If you like it feel free to share! 10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA! 
10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA!
10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA!
Sources:
 
 
 
 

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