The Big and Beautiful Newfoundland: A Breed Guide

Carrie Pallardy
 
From afar, you might confuse a Newfoundland for a small bear. These enormous dogs have long, shaggy coats on top of their already substantial frames. While the breed might look intimidating at first glance, Newfoundlands (affectionately known as Newfies) are beloved for their gentle temperament and trainability.
 

Water Dogs

Newfoundlands are working dogs. The spent many of their early years working on ships, and they retain their capabilities as strong water dogs. The exact origins of the breed are debated, but it is generally agreed upon that these dogs were brought from the island of Newfoundland to England sometime in the 1800s, according to NewfoundlandPuppies.org.
 
Over the course of the breed history, Newfoundlands have served as sled dogs, pack animals and water rescue dogs.
 

Famous Newfies

 
 
From fiction to historic journeys, Newfoundlands have made quite a name for themselves. The Darling children’s protective and beloved dog Nana in Peter Pan is a Newfie. Author J.M. Barrie and his wife had their very own Newfoundland, Luath, according to the Newfoundland Club of America.
 
Another Newfoundland holds a special place in U.S. history. Seaman, an entirely black Newfie, was a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, a journey commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson. Meriwether Lewis, Seaman’s owner, and William Clark set out to explore the Louisiana Purchase and the Pacific Northwest with a faithful canine companion. 
 

The Newfoundland Build and Coat

 
The sheer size of these dogs is likely the first thing you will notice about them. Male Newfies can weigh up to 150 pounds, while females can weigh as much as 120 pounds, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC). These large dogs typically live up to 10 years.
 
The Newfoundland has a thick, water-resistant coat, a handy feature for dogs that have a history of working in the water. Their thick coats do shed and require grooming to be kept healthy. While Seaman was all black, Newfoundlands can also be black and white, gray, and brown.
 

The Newfie Personality

 
 
 These large dogs are known for their slobbery kisses. Newfies are affectionate and loyal and surprisingly gentle given their girth. These dogs can get along well with children and other pets. Just keep in mind, your giant pup might forget her size every once in a while. Supervising any dog around kids is a good idea.
 
While large working dogs, Newfies can settle in right at home indoors. But, they do need exercise every day. Going for a brisk walk or a hike will help satisfy their need to move, and swimming, of course, is a great activity for these dogs.
 
If you dream of having your very own Nana at home, keep in mind the breed does take up quite a bit of space. You have the option of researching breeders, or connecting with organizations like the River King Newfoundland Club to learn about rescue programs.
 

THANK YOU

Thank you for your time and we hope that you found some value in the article.
If you are a Newfoundland lover, you might like what we have for you!
We designed a cool tee and mug for all the Newfoundland lovers. Let us know what you think! If you like it feel free to share! 10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA! 
 
10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA!
10% of Proceeds gets donated to the ASPCA!
Sources:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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